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Tag Archives: Disciple

Reward Is Certain (Spurgeon’s Faith’s Checkbook)

From Charles Spurgeon’s “Faith’s Checkbook”
Reward Is Certain
September 16
And whosoever shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only in the name of a disciple, verily I say unto you, he shall in no wise lose his reward. (Matthew 10:42)

Well, I can do as much as that. I can do a kind act toward the Lord’s servant. The Lord knows l love them all and would count it an honor to wash their feet. For the sake of their Master, I love the disciples.
How gracious of the Lord to mention so insignificant an action — “to give to drink a cup of cold water only”! This I can do, however poor: this I may do, however lowly: this I will do right cheerfully. This, which seems so little, the Lord notices — notices when done to the least of His followers. Evidently it is not the cost, nor the skill, nor the quantity, that He looks at, but the motive: that which we do to a disciple, because he is a disciple, his Lord observes and recompenses. He does not reward us for the merit of what we do but according to His riches of His grace.
I give a cup of cold water, and He makes me to drink of living water. I give to one of His little ones, and He treats me as one of them. Jesus finds an apology for His liberality in that which His grace has led me to do, and He says, “He shall in no wise lose his reward.”

From the Faith’s Checkbook Mobile Devotional Android app – http://www.LookingUpwardApps.com/fcb

 

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Fear Only God (Spurgeon’s Faith’s Checkbook)

From Charles Spurgeon’s “Faith’s Checkbook”
Fear Only God
May 10
So that we may boldy say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me. (Hebrews 13:6)

Because God will never leave nor forsake us, we may well be content with such things as we have. Since the Lord is ours, we cannot be left without a friend, a treasure, and a dwelling place. This assurance may make us feel quite independent of men. Under such high patronage we do not feel tempted to cringe before our fellowmen and ask of them permission to call our lives our own; but what we say we boldly say and defy contradiction.
He who fears God has nothing else to fear. We should stand in such awe of the living Lord that all the threats that can be used by the proudest persecutor should have no more effect upon us than the whistling of the wind. Man in these days cannot do so much against us as he could when the apostle wrote the verse at the head of this page. Racks and stakes are out of fashion. Giant Pope cannot burn the pilgrims now. If the followers of false teachers try cruel mockery and scorn, we do not wonder at it, for the men of this world cannot love the heavenly seed. What then? We must bear the world’s scorn. It breaks no bones. God helping us, let us be bold; and when the world rages, let it rage, but let us not fear it.

From the Faith’s Checkbook Mobile Devotional Android app – http://www.LookingUpwardApps.com/fcb

 

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Reward Is Certain (Spurgeon’s Faith’s Checkbook)

From Charles Spurgeon’s “Faith’s Checkbook”
Reward Is Certain
September 16
And whosoever shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only in the name of a disciple, verily I say unto you, he shall in no wise lose his reward. (Matthew 10:42)

Well, I can do as much as that. I can do a kind act toward the Lord’s servant. The Lord knows l love them all and would count it an honor to wash their feet. For the sake of their Master, I love the disciples.
How gracious of the Lord to mention so insignificant an action — “to give to drink a cup of cold water only”! This I can do, however poor: this I may do, however lowly: this I will do right cheerfully. This, which seems so little, the Lord notices — notices when done to the least of His followers. Evidently it is not the cost, nor the skill, nor the quantity, that He looks at, but the motive: that which we do to a disciple, because he is a disciple, his Lord observes and recompenses. He does not reward us for the merit of what we do but according to His riches of His grace.
I give a cup of cold water, and He makes me to drink of living water. I give to one of His little ones, and He treats me as one of them. Jesus finds an apology for His liberality in that which His grace has led me to do, and He says, “He shall in no wise lose his reward.”

From the Faith’s Checkbook Mobile Devotional Android app – http://www.LookingUpwardApps.com/fcb

 

 

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Matthew’s Story…The Jesus Chronicles By: Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins

Reviewed on: February 19, 2012

Reviewed by:  Bonita L.  for Radiant Lit.com

Genre:  Christian

Publisher:  Putnam Praise…2010

What would cause a young boy like Levi, who was in the process of studying to be a priest in the temple in Jerusalem, to turn from the God of his fathers and take up the disgraceful job of tax collecting?  In “Matthew’s Story” we follow the life of the disciple, Matthew, from his childhood when he was known as Levi in the town of Bet Gurvin, which is 20 miles southwest of Bethlehem, to his adulthood when he gave up tax collecting to become Matthew, a disciple of Jesus of Nazareth.

Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins did a wonderful job of leading us on the life journey of Matthew, from his boyhood as Levi the son of a tanner named Alphaeus, through his decision to go against the teaching of his parents and the temple to take up the one type of employment that is look down up on by his fellow Jews, that of tax collector for Rome.   After bringing shame to his family and cutting himself off from all he once loved, and reaching the pinnacle of power and wealth, Matthew, at the calling of Jesus, leaves all behind to follow and learn from Christ.  LaHaye and Jenkins paint a wonderful, emotion-driven picture of the life and choices of Matthew that allow us to understand the disciple better.  What would make him turn from his family and faith?  What would make Matthew later leave all his wealth and power, to take up with a traveling teacher?  What would bring him to the realization that he was now following the one, true Messiah?  Using Matthew’s own writings from the Bible, LaHaye and Jenkins spin the tale of Matthew’s life so well, that the Bible comes to life with every single word.  This could be the story of millions of people today, who let hardship or loss build a wall that will separate them from loved ones and from God.  It is a story of a wall that is higher and stronger than the walls of Jericho, and harder to reach because it is within the soul of the man.  This is also the story of a Savior, who reached into that soul and broke that wall down completely.

To read more of my review of “Matthew’s Story”  at Radiant Lit.com… http://radiantlit.com/2012/03/review-matthews-storythe-jesus-chronicles/

 

 
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Posted by on March 24, 2012 in Book Reviews

 

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